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The Importance of Wireless WAN Connections for Businesses

shutterstock_328634297Wireless internet connectivity continues to be an important asset for businesses, including wide-area network (WAN) connections. According to Enterprise Management Associates (EMA), 96% of distributed companies rely on wireless for WAN connections in certain remote locations.

Even if businesses aren’t necessarily using wireless for all of their remote sites, it still stands that companies depend on this technology for parts of their operations. The continuously developing wireless technology in today’s IT industry keeps it relevant, with public Wi-Fi and LTE/4G among the most commonly used wireless technologies available for a variety of applications.
Benefits of Using Wireless Technology for Enterprises

WAN has used wireless technology for a long time, but in the past it served mostly as backup connections — which is how many businesses are still using it today. In the event of an outage that occurs in their normal wired WAN link, companies can use wireless 3G or 4G radio instead, helping avoid downtime.
Which Industries Use Wireless Technology the Most?

Some of the industries that rely on wireless technology for WAN connections include banking, insurance, and manufacturing. According to the same EMA study, banking and insurance enterprises use 3G and satellite connections more than others. A 3G connection would make sense in these environments because of the low cost for connecting many single-transaction devices at one time, such as ATMs.

At the same time, manufacturers experiencing dramatic growth may need to connect with an increasing number of remote sites in a timely fashion, and 4G/LTE connections offer an effective temporary connection until they can install wired WAN connections.
Increased Security with Wireless

Wireless technology isn’t only crucial for temporary connectivity. EMA also found that many companies turn to wireless for improved security, better performance, and expanded bandwidth. Only 18% of businesses used it simply because of a lack of a wired connection.

LTE/4G also allows for better security, with top-level encryption over multiple layers of security, making it an ideal form of wireless to install around the world.

EMA predicts that wireless technology will only continue to grow in popularity, and businesses will be able to see the benefits when turning to this technology to support a WAN connection.

Are Wi-Fi Speeds at Their Peak?

shutterstock_328634297Since its inception, Wi-Fi has become an integral part of daily life. If people experience issues when trying to establish a connection, many immediately place the blame on Wi-Fi — but the fact is that this technology is quickly becoming more capable than older connection methods.

While many may be impressed by the speed of today’s Wi-Fi, it is still called into question whether Wi-Fi speeds are truly reaching their full potential. There are several factors that affect Wi-Fi speeds.
Failure to Reach Theoretical ThroughputSince the introduction of Wi-Fi to the public along with the IEEE’s 802.11 standards, maximum data rates for this service have surpassed traditional home internet connections. According to Akamai’s State of the Internet report, in 2016 the average connection has reached 15.3mbps — which is still nowhere near the theoretical max.

This isn’t a new realization, however. Hardware almost never approaches theoretical maximum throughput because of several factors, including interference, multiple clients, and many other factors that affect the data transfer rate. Speed is also largely different in Wi-Fi connections compared to traditional wired connections.

Unlike wired connections, wireless connection speeds don’t just involve the rate of data transfer between handsets and access points. In addition to this rate, Wi-Fi speeds account for availability and duty cycles. Higher data rates result in frequencies that aren’t as heavily used while allowing more devices to connect. On the other hand, faster rates also compound the problem of density.
Solving the Problem of DensityAccording to York College IT director Joel Coehoorn, there are three main issues that render those theoretical maximums unachievable:

  • Maximum speeds pertain to products with unrealistic configurations that no user would actually set.
  • Many people don’t understand that access points must be able to support users operating at the lowest data rate on the network.
  • The more people using the connection, the more that bandwidth has to divide among them, lowering each individual’s speed with every added user.

These limitations make it difficult for wireless connections to meet the maximums, even if the technology is significantly better than other, older types of connections.
Technology Continues to EvolveWireless internet connectivity has made plenty of progress over the years, despite a few setbacks. Clients might see higher theoretical maximums (such as with Wave 2 standards that can achieve a throughput of up to 3.47Gbps), but this only means that the connection on the user end will be faster than what it used to be.