Make those minutes count

Advantages of BYOD

BYODThe edge that small companies have over larger ones is they can move faster and aren’t bound by restrictive agendas. Small businesses will more likely allow employees to work on the device of their choice. It’s a win-win for the owner and staff members who enjoy flexibility in the workplace. Here’s a deeper look at how bring your own device (BYOD) programs help streamline businesses.

BYOD Cuts Costs

The most obvious advantage to BYOD for a company is that it saves money. The company won’t have to invest in as many computers or software licenses, as workers are responsible for bringing their own laptops, notebooks, and smartphones. The firm will not have to keep upgrading hardware and software, and it will cut costs on security.

One of the most valuable advantages to BYOD is that it provides the company with a safety net in case of a power outage or other disruption. Not everyone will be affected by the same network conditions. Businesses will be able to redirect IT personnel to focus on cost efficiency.

Evidence of Successful BYOD Strategies

Harrison Associates is a health care organization that embraces the BYOD concept. By allowing employees to bring their own devices and providing them with IT support, the company has been able to attract experienced talent.

The firm has used a formal BYOD solution that includes Parallels Remote Application Server (RAS) as a more affordable alternative to shared systems management software Citrix. This solution has led to a reduction in support calls and downtime. Another advantage is that it allows employees to see all applications in one area.

Another organization that has enjoyed success with device flexibility is independent mobile games developer Hutch, led by CEO Shaun Rutland. His policy has been to let employees get their work done with the least amount of friction. Some of the cloud services that help shape the company’s communications are Google Apps for Business, Dropbox, GitHub, Slack, and Atlassian.

The company offers maximum device policy flexibility that includes security and management for its workers. Many of them connect and do assignments as needed. The result is a more confident and productive workforce with less than 3% staff turnover.

Terms and Agreement Language

The best way to secure a commitment from employees that they will comply with company policies is by issuing them a Terms and Agreement form to sign. Their signature will confirm that they have read and understand the policy. The form should specify who pays for communications devices and services and who is responsible for damages that may occur to a device.

One area that is essential to address is setting a policy for personal and professional use. Some companies use software that splits a device into two separate compartments. Employees will be expected to not mix work and personal data. The terms should specify devices, job roles, and security requirements. It should also explain remote policies on network use and disciplinary action for not meeting requirements.

Millennials and Unified Communications: What’s the Connection?

shutterstock_328634297The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that Millennials are likely to comprise 50% of the national workforce by 2020, and as much as 75% by 2025. Businesses are beginning to recognize that these individuals are valuable in many ways, including the effective adoption of unified communications (UC) technologies.

UC uses tools such as instant messaging, email, and video chat in a single platform that allows employees to more easily communicate with each other from nearly any location. The main influence behind the increase in UC adoption is the Millennial generation.
How Millennials Are Changing the Landscape

Millennials have benefited from instant communication technology that allows them to easily connect with individuals from any location at any time. Many Millennials are used to this technology out of the workplace, so it’s natural for them to want to utilize that same innovation on the job. This means that if employers want to appeal to the Millennial generation, implementing UC systems is a necessity.

A study published by Bentley University found that 77% of Millennials think that more flexible work hours would result in greater productivity, with 40% relating the same belief regarding remote and virtual work. Also according to the study, many stated that they would be willing to sacrifice pay and promotions in exchange for increased flexibility. The nine-to-five system is becoming obsolete as a result.
Pros and Cons of Unified Communications

There are many reasons for businesses to implement UC. It allows organizations to employ people from nearly anywhere in the world, and retain a dynamic work schedule that helps maintain a consistent workflow. Businesses that operate without any kind of UC system face the risk of falling behind the competition and deterring Millennials—an increasing majority of the workforce.

On the other hand, UC doesn’t come without its risks. Ransomware and hacking attacks are some of the many threats that businesses face, but they can more easily avoid these issues with an effective security system that includes a reliable backup plan.

Ultimately, utilizing UC in business operations can prove invaluable to a business, encouraging Millennials to remain productive and become a part of the company’s success. Without a UC system, companies close themselves off to this lucrative generation.

Making the Switch: A VoIP Adoption Checklist

shutterstock_54629416smFor any business contemplating the switch from an old-fashioned public switched telephone network (PSTN) system to Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), it’s easy to focus on the shiny new functionality and convenience and overlook the potential complications such a transition inevitably entails. To help avoid difficulties and maximize the benefits, here is a checklist of five things to consider before moving to a new VoIP system.

 

How Many Users?

Whether considering hosted VoIP or a premises-based system, it’s important to take into account the size of the user base before signing a service agreement or provisioning the hardware. Ensure that the service provider is capable of accommodating the number of users on the system in addition to enabling potential growth. To that end, it is a good general guideline to add 20% to the maximum projected user count for the next 12 months when calculating how much capacity the new VoIP system will need to support.

How Much Data?

In addition to considering the number of users on the system, it is important to have a reasonably accurate idea of how much data each of those users will require, and to ensure that the network infrastructure can carry that load. On top of being able to deal smoothly with normal bandwidth requirements, a good service provider must be able to handle abnormal surges in the amount of traffic passing through the system.

Upward Mobility

Most workplaces now are mobile, with a great deal of communications and other work being performed on mobile devices. This is largely due to the fact that the vast majority of people now use mobile devices in their personal lives, and they like to continue doing so at work. It is generally better to plan for employees’ preferences to use their personal mobile devices and implement those devices properly than to allow them to be used haphazardly on the VoIP system.

Relationship Worries

Aside from the technical aspects of setting up a new telecommunications system, the relationship with the service provider is an important consideration. Look for signs that a VoIP service provider is professional and values its clients. A service provider who takes unduly long to respond to questions or continuously attempts to up-sell potential customers before they’ve even sold the service is probably not a good choice.

Hidden Costs

It’s quite easy to look no further than the startup costs when considering the effects of switching to VoIP, but a more sound approach is to consider the total cost of ownership (TCO), which includes both startup and operating costs. Hosted services might involve lower startup costs than premises-based systems, but the operational expenses are sure to be higher.

Making the switch to VoIP services can be a daunting task. By considering these five areas, the process is more likely to be successful.